The Great conjunction will happen on December 21st, 2020, the appearance of Jupiter and Saturn close together is happening about every 20 years. The degree of separation is always different and this year both planets will appear nearly as one in the sky. Last time it was this close was in the year 1623. Back then the position was so close to the sun, probably no one was able to see it. Last time before that? In 1226. What a rare sight. Better be well prepared!

I headed out this week to scout suitable locations and to take some test shots as the planets are closing in on each other every day. Also, the crescent Moon was nearby, so I hoped to catch all three in one photo.

A wonderful day, about -12C, snowy roads and almost perfectly clear skies…. Well, almost. Can you see that small band of clouds above the horizon.? This is where the Moon was ‘hiding’.

Without textSearching for the moon_with text

It turned out to be a real challenge to escape those clouds AND to find a location for visibility. Eventually I found a spot where I saw the Moon and the planets. As you can imagine, the location wasn’t very exciting. Trying to find a clear view without a tree in the middle was impossible. Either the planets or the Moon were missing. This was it. After the long search, it was great to see them all!

Preparing the great conjunctionWithout text

After this I decided to drive to the sea where a clear view was pretty much guaranteed. On the way I was thinking about composition, reflections of the planets and the Moon, I was very excited. Arriving at the sea, I found my ‘old friend’ again, that “%& (read: lovely) band of clouds covering the Moon once again. Seeing the reflection of Jupiter was wonderful.

At the seaAt the sea with text

With growing darkness also Saturn reflected on the Baltic Sea and an hour later the Planets disappeared behind the clouds.

The weather forecast for Dec 21st here is rather hopeless, clouds and more clouds.

Hopefully some of you have good weather and are looking to the stars after sunset seeing the great conjunction!

Hope you are safe and well,
Thomas